stress

7 posts, 7 contributors

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katrin3014 DAFNE Graduate
Croydon NHS
1 post

I know stress can effect hypergylycaemia - can it also increase hypos?

novorapidboi26 DAFNE Graduate
NHS Lanarkshire
1,800 posts

I think stress is just another process which results in the release of hormones and therefore for each individual diabetic, there is a possibility of highs and lows, as insulin sensitivity is effected amongst many other processes.........

Its most definitely possible for sure..........

Welcome to the forum..........

Rafa DAFNE Graduate
St Vincent's Dublin
99 posts

Was out for a run a few weeks back and was 7.7 then when i came back i was 9.1. Anyway came under some stress then for an hour or so and checked my BG and i was 18.8.

glen4 DAFNE Graduate
Taunton and Somerset Hospital, Taunton
46 posts

Rafa said:
Was out for a run a few weeks back and was 7.7 then when i came back i was 9.1. Anyway came under some stress then for an hour or so and checked my BG and i was 18.8.


Yeah I've had that before! I've been 8.0 before my run. I've covered 8 miles in warm weather fairly quickly! Then to my amazement I've been 16.4!? I've expected it to be lower or around the 4.0-5.0 range! A couple of HCP'S have said it could be an adrenaline rush!? It varies from person to person! It doesn't happen every time! Did you get a rapid/sharp fall later in the day?

Vickyp DAFNE Graduate
Durham Diabetes Network
137 posts

Katrin3014 I've had hypos during periods of stress; as far as aware generally it causes hypers but in some individuals it can cause hypos

Alan 49 DAFNE Graduate
Maidstone General Hospital
284 posts

As glen4 says: an adrenaline rush can cause high blood-sugars. The adrenaline triggers the liver to release glucagon (?) into the blood because the body assumes you're going to require extra energy. When I go swimming, my BG is always higher afterwards. My HCP explained that going to a swimming bath and meeting people you know etc, can cause the adrenaline rush.

dunkers7 DAFNE Graduate
NHS Lanarkshire
24 posts

Sometimes it can cause both hypos and hypers!

The pattern I've found when I go for a 5k run in the evening seems unusual:
* BG drops initially, usually by 10 when testing immediately post exercise, assuming no food/drink during the run
* 2 hours later, BG goes back up to almost the level it was before I started the run! (I think this is due to the adrenaline)
* Overnight, BG will drop by 10 unless I have negatively corrected my levemir for exercise, or eaten some carbs before bed.

My BG going back up confused me initially, but it turns out that's just what consistently happens in my case.

Only way to know for sure what stress does to your BG is to test it.